IUOE Local 150
IUOE Local 150
MOE Benefit Funds
MOE Benefit Funds
Apprenticeship and Skill Improvement Program
Apprenticeship and Skill Improvement Program
Employer’s Hub
Employer’s Hub
My150
My150

Brothers and Sisters, as shared late Friday on May 31st, prior to the expiration of the contract, Local 150 reached tentative agreements on the District 1-2-3 Heavy- Highway/Underground and Building Agreements, averting a strike that threatened to shut down work the following Monday. After weeks of little movement, and hours into negotiations, the union reached a tentative agreement.

Local 150 negotiated with MARBA, Excavators, Inc., and the Contractors Association of Will and Grundy Counties, which were followed by negotiations with Illinois Valley Contractors Association and CAICA. These are historic agreements that are going to allow billions of dollars of construction work to continue uninterrupted. More details will be shared following the ratification meeting scheduled for June 9th at 9 a.m. at the A.S.I.P. Training Center. We will keep you posted on the ratification process.

As May closed out, multiple contracts were set to expire on the 31st of the month. This included everything from shop agreements to our two major contracts: The Building Agreement and Heavy and Highway and Underground Districts Agreements in Districts 1, 2, 3 & 5.

Steve Cisco, Rob Paszta (Associate General Counsel), and I focused on our two big agreements, Heavy and Highway and Underground Districts and Building, while John Ahlgrim and Stanley Simrayh have been diligently working on the shop agreements. Rob Paszta, John Ahlgrim, and Jeff Horne have successfully wrapped up all the Crane Barn agreements for Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8. Additionally, Dave Fagan has worked meticulously on the District 6 & 7 contract proposals (more details are in the Financial Secretary’s Report) for the Four County Highway Contractors Group, the Highway Heavy and Utility ICI-LRD (10-county highway), and the NIICG (14-county highway).

The details related to agreements for Crane Barns, Rental Shops, and Surveyors were shared in my report last month. This season, we have come back with significant wins for our members, which have led to some of the best contracts for unions in North America. And we are not done yet. Local 150 is letting it be known in every negotiation meeting that we will continue to apply pressure wherever we can to ensure we are protecting our jurisdiction of work and looking at economics regarding the impact of inflation.

We still have open some rental shop agreements, which John and Stanley will continue to negotiate, and Republic Services. However, I want to step back for a moment and highlight the work Local 150 has done that makes getting agreements that set industry standards possible. This work is related to market share.

I mentioned at the District 1 meeting in May that in cities across the country we are seeing unions share stories in newspapers, on tv and radio, and in social posts about the loss of union jobs to non-union companies. They are asking themselves why, over the last few decades, has there been such a downturn in securing work for their members.

It’s a tough thing to witness fellow brothers and sisters dealing with these situations. When a union loses out to non-union companies, it means the union loses more than just a job. It loses a piece of its market share. Ultimately, a loss in market share has a ripple effect on everything from keeping talented men and women working, to the ability to ensure fair pay, to determining how hard you can negotiate when a contracts end.

At Local 150, I’m proud to report to you that we have a much different narrative. This is critical for us with the large number of negotiations we face this season. Every contract we are in the midst of redoing, we are able to fight harder for each of you because of the relentless work by Local 150 to grind out and earn every percentage of our market share that we have.

I want to remind you that this wasn’t always the case. In fact, a good majority of the companies we are negotiating with today at one time in our history were non-union. As I have shared before, when then President-Business Manager Bill Dugan took over in 1986, our membership was at 9,000 members. My job, as the first organizer, was to grow our numbers. Our hard work for close to 40 years is the reason why today we are nearly 24,000 members strong and lead the market share in each of the sectors in which our members work.

If Local 150 had not started organizing when we did, we wouldn’t be where we are today, in Illinois, and parts of Indiana and Iowa, at 98 percent market share. Our powerful foothold in the market allows us to solidify projects being let for this season, and as far out as five or more years from now. In addition to our organizing efforts, our work in the crane barns to move contracts from an 8(f) to 9(a) protected our core jurisdiction, as did adding stronger successor language. Local 150 has made moves to strengthen itself like solidifying its pension, thus taking away our unfunded liability; eliminating the liability of retiree healthcare, self-funding our apprenticeship program (which will expand even further, as you see from the cover picture taken at our groundbreaking on the soon-to-be largest indoor training arena in the U.S.), and the lobbying done in Springfield to help our members as well as workers in every union across the entire State of Illinois.

The work we have done on our own to make whole our pension, health care, training program, and more makes us stronger. Not only do we lead the market share, we track it, and analyze it. We take seriously every job no matter how small, like digging basements for single-family homes, or big, like working on data centers worth billions of dollars. It is because every job matters, we are ahead of the game and consistently moving forward so that we never lose our footing in the marketplace.

No matter what company or association we face, Local 150 has the right staff to fight for each of you. At the end of the day, we know it’s not about a pat on the back, it’s about a buck on the check. This negotiation season, we have been forthright by saying we are not doing any extensions. When a contract ends, if needed, we will strike. We want to be acknowledged; and we want to get paid because we deserve it. Our members are highly skilled, and get the job done on time and under budget.

Local 150’s market share is our strongest bargaining chip when we come to the table at negotiation time. With this chip in our stack, we will continue to fight hard so that our members are treated with respect. Let’s keep working in one of the most robust construction markets seen in our lifetime. Stay safe this season.

United We Stand, Divided We Fall.